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Chancellor's Report: 2010-2011 Milestones
Chia-Chi Chuang came to UNCG on a graduate fellowship after reading about the work of nutrition professor Dr. Michael McIntosh. Since arriving on campus in 2007, she's made significant discoveries related to obesity and diabetes.

Chia-Chi Chuang came to UNCG on a graduate fellowship after reading about the work of nutrition professor Dr. Michael McIntosh. Since arriving on campus in 2007, she's made significant discoveries related to obesity and diabetes.

Nutrition doctoral student makes new discoveries related to diabetes and obesity

Chia-Chi Chuang, a fourth year doctoral student in nutrition, recently discovered another important factor in preventing the inflammation associated with obesity and insulin resistance. Chia-Chi's research findings, published in the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry in 2010, confirmed the French paradox, which holds that consuming a diet containing grape products rich in phytochemicals like resveratrol helps minimize one's risk for obesity and diabetes. Now Chuang, who came to UNCG from Taipei on a graduate scholarship, has made a new discovery. Her latest study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition in 2010, compares the effectiveness of resveratrol to another plant compound, quercetin. Her findings suggest that quercetin, a phytochemical found in grapes, apples and onions, is as effective, if not more effective, than resveratrol in preventing inflammation associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes. Currently, Chuang is conducting a study with obese mice fed a high-fat diet to determine the extent to which grape powder rich in quercetin reduces chronic inflammation and diabetes. These studies are expected to increase research-based evidence supporting the consumption of grapes and grape products to combat obesity-mediated chronic inflammation.